Wednesday, 5 September 2012

The Lister 'D' 1.5 HP 28DH Engine.

You know how I'm always harping on about never having enough money? What? You didn't know that? Sorry I thought you did. Anyway I am, and I do. I have been trying to clear my overdraft for months. Last week I really thought I was getting somewhere. Another week of living on air John, I thought to myself, and you will be overdraft free. I even allowed myself a moment or two of smug satisfaction. Oh dear! I shouldn't have done that.






Look what I just bought with the money I don't have. Isn't it beautiful? Isn't it gorgeous? Isn't it just about the most wonderful piece of machinery you ever did see? Yes I thought you would agree. Who wouldn't. I expect if you had seen it first you would have snapped it up too. And who could blame you? Certainly not me.

It is a Lister engine, built in the 1940's or 50's. There aren't too many left in the world. Becoming rare. So you see, not only am I the owner of this beautiful machine, but I am preserving an important historical item. So actually the sacrifice of my overdraft status is really a small price to pay. I regret nothing.

Of course it will increase in value, everything I buy does. Unfortunately I never seem able to realise that value when I sell something, and always lose out. I once sold a vintage Mark 2 Jaguar car for a few hundred quid, only to see a similar one sell for thousands just a few years later.

But look at the trolley it is mounted on. Look at those old cast iron wheels. Blimey they have to be worth what I paid for it alone. That's a genuine hardwood chassis. How much do you pay for hardwood these days?

But I didn't buy this engine to make a profit. I bought it because I wanted to. That's a good enough reason to do anything. Oh and I almost forgot. It comes with a genuine Lister water pump. This I'm told is worth even more than the engine itself. What a bonus.

Having been assured that it was in working order, "These things go on forever," "There's not much can go wrong with `em," "Worked perfectly the last time it was started," etc, etc. I eagerly, and full of excited anticipation, gave the starting handle a couple of turns. Then a gave it a couple of turns more. Eventually, after a couple of hours cranking, I came to the conclusion that the engine wasn't going to start, but if I didn't stop cranking the flipping thing, my heart might stop. So it is in the shed while I give my next move some thought.

It shouldn't cost a lot to put it right, but money's not a problem, because I have this marvellous overdraft facility, which comes in really useful every time I decide to make myself look like a gullible fool!







14 comments:

  1. Nice! Never trust someone who tells you something works until they can prove to you it actually does! :)

    Hope it doesn't take too much to get it in working condition. Shouldn't there be a belt that connects the pump to the engine or do they work seperately and the pump is the one missing a belt?

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    1. They are separate things Wanda, joined by belts. You can run lots of different machines with this one engine.

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  2. Men and machinery. It spells misfortune more often than not.

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  3. Indeed an handsome engine. Looks something like a commercial cherry pitter. What would you like to power with it?

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  4. Well I may not understand what it is and what it does (or should do) but if it makes you happy that's all that matters.

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  5. Give it a clean and a decoke, remember to tickle the carb before you crank it....... just for a second you thought I knew what I was talking about. Sorry to say I dont really. I laughed out loud at your last paragraph, you really are the dogs John. I feel sure you will get loads of pleasure tinkering with it and the satisfying putter putter putter when you do get it going will be worthwhile. Good luck.

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  6. Maybe we'd all be better off if we ran on diesel. Good luck with the project, John, and above all have fun.

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  7. Er, whilst your story is delightful, I have yet to learn what it actually does... or, as Ann said, what it should do. However, since I have a fascination with machinery I don't blame you for acquiring ... er ... whatever it is.

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  8. You have begun to spend money on "luxuries" and haven't sold your book as yet...what are we to do with you John?
    Enjoy tinkering with your new find....hope it works eventually, if not I'm canceling your overdraft.

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  9. Turn the wheel on top of the carb 3/4 to the left , thumb on top of plunger thingy next to it , Not the float bowl . I f i don't put my thumb on that thingy i can crank for weeks lol . once it bursts into life turn the wheel mid way'ish adjust until no smoke and runs , Smile

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  10. Turn the wheel on top of the carb 3/4 to the left , thumb on top of plunger thingy next to it , Not the float bowl . I f i don't put my thumb on that thingy i can crank for weeks lol . once it bursts into life turn the wheel mid way'ish adjust until no smoke and runs , Smile

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